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Bagpipes, burials, blunders & septic tanks . . .

26 Jun

To paraphrase Art Linkletter in his old-time television show, Kids say the darndest things, humor can be found in the darndest places. I received this e-mail recently from a lovely retired couple in Florida that migrated from North to South, legally of course, leaving the winters of Ohio and fleeing for the flora and fauna of Florida, going from icicles to iguanas, from shoveling snow to seeking shade, and apparently living and loving every minute of life in the sunshine state.

I freely admit, with not a smidgen of shame, that I took a few liberties with the original e-mail and in my not-so-humble opinion I approved it immeasurably. In the original e-mail, for example, the bagpipe player said he felt badly about being too late for the graveside services.

No, no, no, never—not no, but hell no! If one feels badly, then one has a deficiency in one’s ability to feel, to exercise the tactile sense of touch. Consider this: Does anyone ever say that they felt goodly about anything? No, they say they felt good, not goodly, about whatever the feeling was that generated how they felt. There were numerous other improvements involving wayward commas, failure to capitalize when needed, attempts to reflect regional dialects of Kentucky and redundant terms such as like I’ve never played before—the word never does not need before.

I rest my case, and I now offer the edited e-mail:

Bagpipes at a funeral . . .

As a bagpiper I play many gigs. Recently I was asked by a funeral director to play at a graveside service for a homeless man. The departed had no family or friends, and the service was to be at a pauper’s cemetery in rural Kentucky. I was not familiar with the backwoods and got lost, and being a typical man I didn’t stop for directions.

I finally arrived an hour late and saw that the funeral workers were gone, and the hearse was nowhere in sight. Only the diggers and their equipment remained, and the men were eating lunch in the shade of a nearby tree.

I felt bad about being too late for the ceremony and I apologized to the workers. I went to the side of the grave and looked down and saw that the vault lid was already in place. I didn’t know what else to do, so I started to play.

The workers put down their lunches and gathered around with their hardhats in hand. I played my heart and soul out for that man with no family and no friends. I played for that homeless man like I’ve never played for anyone.

I played Amazing Grace, and as I played the workers began to weep. They wept and I wept, and we all wept together. When I finished I packed up my bagpipes and started for my car. Though my head hung low, my heart was full.

As I opened the door to my car I heard one of the workers say, I have never seen or heard of anything like that, and I’ve been putting in septic tanks for twenty years.

Apparently I was still lost—it must be a man thing.

Postscript: The internet offers several versions of this story by different bloggers—none are better than this one and some, while not necessarily worse, are not as good as this one—take your pick.

That’s my story and I’m sticking to it.

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3 responses to “Bagpipes, burials, blunders & septic tanks . . .

  1. Kelley

    June 26, 2011 at 9:15 am

    Now that one was laugh out loud funny this fine Sunday morning. Thank you for that, Dad.

     
    • thekingoftexas

      June 27, 2011 at 5:10 am

      Aw, shucks, ‘twarnt nuthin—Michael’s dad sent me the e-mail and I just appropriated it for my blog. However—and that’s a big however—as with most missives roaming around the internet it needed a bit of tweaking, which I did to the best of my ability before I sent it on its way again. Thanks for visiting and thanks for the comment.

       
  2. DeAnn

    July 5, 2011 at 4:50 pm

    And it was still laugh “out loud funny” on Tuesday late afternoon. Seriously, my daughter came from several rooms over to check on me.

    By the way … No AOL acct. I sign in to comment as a guest on your the expanded version of your blog. The iPad user-friendly version forbids comment … Which doesn’t seem very friendly at all. A laugh like that demands the courtesy of a thank you!

     

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